Meatless Monday Recipe: Edamame Wontons

I love edamame, and I love potstickers.  Most potstickers are made with pork, which I don’t eat.  But these Edamame Wontons look like just the thing to tame a potsticker craving, with far fewer fat & calories.

Edamame are a great protein source and have powerful superfood properties since they are antioxidant-rich and contain both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.  In short, they are a perfect Meatless Monday appetizer or meal.

Edamame Wontons

Photo courtesy of myrecipes.com

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups shelled frozen edamame (10 oz. package)
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 tablespoon minced chives
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 30 round wonton wrappers (3 1/2 in. diameter)
  • Cilantro leaves
  • Soy sauce, for serving

Preparation

1. Cook edamame according to package instructions.
2. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking water; drain edamame and set 3/4 cup aside.
3. In a blender, whirl remaining 1 cup edamame with ginger, lemon juice, salt, and about 1/3 to 1/2 cup reserved cooking water.
4. Transfer edamame paste to a bowl, mix with whole edamame and chives.
5. Bring a large, deep pot of salted water to a gentle boil and add vegetable oil.
6. Fill wonton wrappers with 1 tsp. edamame filling and top filling with a cilantro leaf (cover unfilled wrappers with a moist towel). Moisten wrapper edges with water, fold over filling, and press to seal. Boil wontons in batches until they float to surface, 2 minutes. Serve with soy sauce.

The recipe is originally from Sunset Magazine‘s December 2007 issue.

Looking for other meatless recipes?  Try these:

Spicy Veggie Frittata

Spicy Veggie Frittata

Quinoa Shiitake Mushroom Recipe

Quinoa with Shiitake Mushrooms

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All You Need to Know About Asian Superfoods, Part 3

Sharing the last of my Asian superfood series with you today, part 3 of 3.  Some of these were familiar to me… others not so familiar.  But variety is the spice of life, right? 🙂

And speaking of spice…

The first superfood on the list today is turmeric.  Turmeric is used for its anti-cancer properties, as well as an immunity booster and liver detoxifier.  If you are a fan of Indian food (namely curries), you may recognize turmeric as a key ingredient.

curry shrimp

Turmeric is said to be helpful in fighting the common cold, as well as other respiratory problems.  Researchers at the Cork Cancer Research Center in Ireland treated esophageal cancer cells with curcumin (the chemical found in turmeric which gives curry that distinctive yellow color)  and found it began to kill cancer cells within 24 hours!

Next is soybeans.  Soybeans are rich in protein, isoflavones (which have antioxidant benefits) as well as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids (heart-healthy!). They also contain potassium and magnesium, which are necessary for our muscles to contract and relax.  Edamame are probably the most well-know type of soybean.  You can buy them in the frozen food section of most super markets.  Once thawed, they are a great addition to salads.  I love ordering steamed edamame as an appetizer when I go out for sushi.

soy beans, edamame

Last in the superfood series are two fruits — wolfberries (also known as goji berries) and pomegranates.

Wolfberries are rich in vitamin C and selenium, which both protect the heart and aid in cancer prevention.  They are also high in vitamin A – excellent for the eyes and skin.  You can usually find them amongst the dried fruits in markets like Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s.

Pomegranates are loaded with antioxidants, potassium, vitamin B and vitamin C.  My friend sprinkles pomegranate seeds on top of her fruit salads, which adds a very interesting visual appeal.  Pomegranate juices are readily available in pretty much every super market, making it super easy to get your superfood boost.  There is even a POM supplement now for those who want the benefits without the added calories in a juice.

 

I hope you found the Asian superfood series interesting and perhaps have added a new thing or two to your diet.  I find that variety keeps cooking at home a task that is enjoyable rather than draining.  If you missed parts 1 and 2 of the series, you can find them here:

Asian Superfood Series, Part One

Asian Superfood Series, Part Two